BASICS OF CONTAINER PLANTER DESIGN

You see beautiful designs of potted plants in the courtyards, in the businesses and on the streets of the city and you wish you had that kind of green thumb. Would not that boat be beautiful with those colors and texture in your patio or on your terrace? How do those gardeners make designs of plants in such beautiful pots? They follow the ten basic principles of container pot creativity. When you start dreaming about the design of your container pot, it is good that you know the basic principles of planting containers so that your decision produces the effects you want.

Style

In general, you will see two design styles with some variations between those styles. The most common style for vertical containers uses the focal point, the fill, and the trailer. A focal point plant stands out above the rest for being taller and / or more colorful. The focal point is the first to attract your attention. The filling plants are used to complement the focal plant. They are good for providing color and texture and are used to cover the bare parts of the pot. Towing plants hang over the edge of the pot and add softness to the design. The second style of design is to use the same type of plant, in bulk, with variations to create the difference in appearance. It is best to use plants that are dense and cover or fill the entire pot.

Type of pot

Your choice of design will be significantly affected by the size and type of pot you are working with. Almost anything can be used for a container pot. First, choose your plants with the size of the pot in mind. A simple pot can use more interesting plants like emphasis, while simple plants can leave the focus on an ornate pot. Another consideration is whether your flowerpot is a vertical pot or a hanging pot. The hanging planter will require plants that have the genetics to hang instead of growing upright.

Size

Determine the size of the pot you are planting and choose plants that fit the pot. An initial rule is to choose plants that will be twice the height of the focal plant and one and a half times the width of the pot for the filling plants. This is not a rule established in stone, but a guide. For a faster and more complete appearance of your planter’s design, choose plants that are not too young (immature) but that are closer to the desired size for the design.

Desired effect

Decide if your container planter will be a focal point of your landscape design or a complement to the rest of your design and choose accordingly. This can affect the choice of size and the desire to combine or highlight.

Color

The color selection is open. A good starting point is to choose colors to combine or complement a landscape or home. For a mix of colors, choose colors that are opposite each other on the color wheel. For a more monochromatic design, choose a color and use different variations of the same color.

Texture

Some plants are chosen for their texture rather than for their color. The texture is usually a factor of the leaves of the plant, and you can add an alternative option to create a different style. Choose plants with a variety of texture and sizes of leaves for an additional effect to your design.

Sun vs. Shadow

It is important to choose plants that are adapted to the area where the container will be located. Usually, plants are labeled to know if they can thrive in full sun, sun or shade. If you have a container that you can move with the stations, you can be more flexible with your choices if you follow the above simple Imagineplants.com tips.